Once a Member, Always a Member, Part 3

By November 18, 2018Blog, News, Newsletter

Monday begins another school year.  The teachers are making their final lesson plans, straightening up their classrooms, printing out their first assignments, etc.…  The excitement and stress are in the air. The hustle and bustle are seen everywhere you go.   This is my life now. This was my life before my surgery.  Life keeps moving forward, but there have been a few changes.

I had a cavernous hemangioma which led to brain surgery in 2014.

What is an ABI- acquired brain injury?

Acquired brain injury is what they call my brain injury.  When exactly things started, I don’t know, but I can tell you at least 2 defining moments to that brain injury.  The first was the worst headache of my life. Needless to say, there was an overnight stay in the hospital in 2008, and many tests, which only left me with more questions than answers.  Then, toward the end of 2013, while at dismissal with my students, I started seeing halos which led to more doctor appointments, more MRIs, and ultimately to brain surgery.

Before surgery, both sides of my body worked in unison; however, surgery left me with aphasia, hemiparesis, and hemisensory loss.  It has been 4 years, 2 months, and 2 days since surgery and I still notice the effects of surgery. But I can say that time, in this case, has been my friend.

After surgery, I went to rehab for the summer.  It was a struggle and pulled on all my heartstrings – emotional, mental, physical, and spiritual.  In my mind, it was happening to me, and me ALONE. How could my family understand? And that is where I was for a long time.  I was wrong. It wasn’t happening to just me, it was happening to the whole family.

Recovery takes time, patience, and understanding.

It reminds me of the song, “Put One Foot in Front of the Other”.

Put one foot in front of the other

And soon you’ll be walking ‘cross the floor

Put one foot in front of the other

And soon you’ll be walking out the door

If you want to change your direction

If your time of life is at hand

Well don’t be the rule, be the exception

A good way to start is to stand

For those of you going through a brain injury, remember, it isn’t happening to just you.  Let your family in. Work together and use a lot of patience and understanding with each other.

~Stacy B. (submitted August 2018)