Depression Awareness

By October 29, 2019Blog, News, Resources

Depression affects around 18 million Americans (1 in 10 annually). It may not appear as a broken leg or something physically wrong but it is a medical disorder that dominates the brain. Depression symptoms can include withdrawal from activities, loss of pleasure, hopelessness, and suicidal thoughts. It is a debilitating state of mind that infiltrates you with negative thoughts and without a support group of friends or family those thoughts become your reality. 

 For people with traumatic brain injuries, depression affects 3 in 10 people. It is difficult to gauge when someone is depressed; it could be a year later or right after your injury (WebMd, 2017). Speaking as a seasoned TBI survivor, it came later for me. When I began to process what had happened to me, my life completely changed gears. I think many people with TBI’s can relate to this. TBI’s can make your whole life change.

If you start to notice that you feel sad or depressed most of the day, have a loss of interest in usual activities, or eating too little or not enough, it is possible you are depressed (Mayo Clinic, 2019). If you go to any self-help website or look-up treatments for depression, you will likely get a number for a suicide prevention hotline. If you are having thoughts of injuring yourself or suicide, please contact the suicide hotline immediately. You can call or chat online, https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/. In my unprofessional opinion, taking medication or talking to someone a few minutes to come off the ledge is a temporary fix. It puts a band-aid on the outside so you look fine to everyone else. However, really your soul is damaged and you’re suffering. The most beneficial way to treat depression, rather than numb it, is to join a support group, or talk to a licensed counselor. Also, do things that genuinely make you happy.

With depression it is most important to never be alone when you’re sad. That’s when negative thoughts seep into your mind and worsen your mood. For me, it helped to do crafts to express my feelings, like drawing and painting, I also enjoy writing.  Community is crucial for healing. 

~ Livia, BIND Member