By Jenny T

British statesman Winston Churchill once wrote, “Those that fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it.”  In my family we take this as a challenge. Both my grandfather and my father-in-law served in WWII, so patriotism is very important to us. 

It is now that time of year that we as Americans should turn our collective attention to the Epic 1944 Invasion That Changed the Course of WWII. The Allied invasion of Normandy was among the largest military operations ever taged.Without the brilliant planning and heroic sacrifices of the D-Day invasion, the Allies may have never defeated the Nazi forces in Europe.

The D-Day invasion is significant in history for the role it played in WWII. It marked the turn of the tide for the control maintained by Nazi Germany; less than a year after the invasion, the Allies formally accepted Nazi Germany’s surrender. 

Though the ‘D’ in D-Day doesn’t actually stand for anything. The military used the term D-Day to designate the launch date of a mission.he term has become synonymous with the remembrance of June 6, 1944, when more than 156,000 American, British and Canadian troops stormed 50 miles of Normandy’s fiercely defended beaches in northern France. 

Not only was D-Day the largest amphibious invasion in military history.

It is also interesting to note that Allied forces carried out a massive deception campaign in advance of D-Day. In addition bad  weather delayed the invasion.

Allied losses on D-Day are estimated to be around 4,413 dead. German numbers are not well recorded, but it is estimated that between 4,000 and 9,000 were killed. The Battle of Normandy was fierce and bloody and would last until late August when the Allies crossed the Seine River towards Paris. Casualty rates were slightly higher than they were during a typical day during the Battle of the Somme in 1916. Over 425,000 Allied and German troops were wounded, killed or listed as missing during the Battle of Normandy. Of these, around 200,000 were Allied casualties of which almost 53,714 were killed. No reliable figures exist for the German losses, but it is estimated that around 200,000 were killed or wounded with approximately 200,000 more taken prisoner. French civilian casualties during the Battle of Normandy stand at around 19,890 – not including the estimated 15,000 that had been killed during bombardments prior to D-Day. The Battle left 120,000 Normandy buildings destroyed and a further 270,000 damaged.

It was a day that cost many lives on all sides of the conflict, changing not only the future of countries, but of families as well. Because of that, there is much to be learned from those who experienced its victories and its horrors first hand.

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